Prof. Dr. Kenneth Hunt

Affiliated Group Head

Bern University of Applied Sciences, Engineering and Information Technology

Phone
+41 34 426 43 69
E-Mail
Kenneth.Hunt@bfh.ch
Postal Address
Bern University of Applied Sciences
Engineering and Information Technology
Pestalozzistrasse 20
CH-3400 Burgdorf

Kenneth J. Hunt is a Professor and Director of the Institute for Rehabilitation and Performance Technology at Bern University of Applied Sciences in Burgdorf, Switzerland. He was previously co-founder and inaugural Director of Research at the Scottish Centre for Innovation in Spinal Cord Injury, based within the Queen Elizabeth National Spinal Injuries Unit in Glasgow. He was also Wylie Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Director of the Centre for Rehabilitation Engineering at the University of Glasgow. He has held visiting positions at the Sensory-Motor Systems Laboratory, ETH-Zürich, at Swiss Paraplegic Research in Nottwil, and at the Department of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering at the University of Sheffield. In the 1990s he spent five years working on advanced control systems with Daimler-Benz AG, Research and Technology, in Berlin. Professor Hunt specialises in basic and applied research in the modelling and control of complex biomedical and healthcare-related systems. Applications are mainly in the fields of medical and sports engineering, with a strong focus on cardiopulmonary and neurological rehabilitation.

Number of items: 2.

Journal Article

Frotzler, Angela; Coupaud, Sylvie; Perret, Claudio; Kakebeeke, Tanja H; Hunt, Kenneth J; Eser, Prisca (2009). Effect of detraining on bone and muscle tissue in subjects with chronic spinal cord injury after a period of electrically-stimulated cycling: a small cohort study. Journal of rehabilitation medicine, 41(4), pp. 282-5. Uppsala (Sweden): Foundation of Rehabilitation Information 10.2340/16501977-0321

Frotzler, Angela; Coupaud, Sylvie; Perret, Claudio; Kakebeeke, Tanja H; Hunt, Kenneth J; Donaldson, Nick de N; Eser, Prisca (2008). High-volume FES-cycling partially reverses bone loss in people with chronic spinal cord injury. Bone, 43(1), pp. 169-76. New York, N.Y.: Elsevier 10.1016/j.bone.2008.03.004

This list was generated on Thu Sep 21 06:00:07 2017 CEST.